Western Canadian migration seems slow

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Bob Buskas
Posts: 600
Joined: Sat Nov 15, 2003 8:08 pm
Location: Wetaskiwin Alberta, Canada

Archer, take a look at my website, you could try my Robin Proof Oyster bar. It takes a while for the Martins to get use to the roof and sides but it does work very well once they get use too it. Email me privately and I can give you the details on it.
Bob Buskas, Alberta, Canada (The Northern Sky's Colony) Supplimental feeding is the key during bad weather, but you must train them to feed ahead of time.
Robbo
Posts: 623
Joined: Tue Jun 09, 2009 2:53 pm
Location: Leduc, Alberta, Canada.

bought one did not work out. took off the plexiglass and the Martin's use it for oyster shells and crickets.
2009. 98 eggs, 66 hatch, 61 fledged.
2010. 114 eggs, 89 hatch,70 fledged.
2011. 96 eggs. 80 hatch,68 fledged.Heavy Merlin preditation.
2012. 89 eggs. 56 hatch, good fledge. Guards installed. Merlin not sighted at houses.
2013. First Egg May 24, first Baby June 13.
2014. successful.
2015. successful.
2016. Martin's population decline, suspect new housing in the neighborhood. Merlin eating well also!
2017.Population explosion :grin: . first egg May 25 in a BO-11
2018. Population stable.
Curtis Reil
Posts: 119
Joined: Mon Apr 29, 2013 7:51 pm
Location: Alberta/Tofield
Martin Colony History: I inherited this colony when I purchased the property from my Great Uncle. To the best of my knowledge, he had hosted Martins since 1977. Housing consisted of three twelve compartment units that he had built. Small compartments, round holes and no way to lower for managing. There were maybe 6-8 pairs here when we moved in. Through reading up on information provided by the PMCA and that provided to me by Bob Buskas, the decision was made to upgrade the housing. We are now fully switched over to North Star houses and hosted 58 pairs this season(2017). 60 compartments open for business and being so close to 100% occupancy, I believe we may expand housing offered next season. Expansion will continue contingent to high occupancy, being able to keep up on management and or until it starts to feel like work.

Dang. I'm no where close to full. Sitting roughly 50% of what I was hoping to see back for ASY's. Who knows. We could get an influx of birds again. Haven't seen any hummers yet but had an Oriole here yesterday and Grosbeaks have arrived as well.

I'm going to have to try removing the plexiglass on my oyster bar. I thought I might have placed it to close to my house but the plexiglass could be the ticket. Worth a try for sure.

Thanks for the tips fellas.
Bob Buskas
Posts: 600
Joined: Sat Nov 15, 2003 8:08 pm
Location: Wetaskiwin Alberta, Canada

Curtis, yes to start with the Oyster bar, you need to remove the roof. But once the Martins get use to using it you can install it again. Then comes the Robin proof sides. One step at a time. It all takes time and training, but it does work. Believe me.... been there . You always start with the roof removed.
Bob Buskas, Alberta, Canada (The Northern Sky's Colony) Supplimental feeding is the key during bad weather, but you must train them to feed ahead of time.
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