Gourd Spacing

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ridinshotgun
Posts: 3
Joined: Sat Mar 25, 2017 9:53 pm
Location: Virginia

I am rebuilding my gourd racks this winter and going form PVC arms to aluminum angle but also want to increase my gourd count from my current 8 to either 16 or 24 but I need some info on what is the minimum spacing needed between gourds. I see some of the commercial racks have 3 gourds to a 48 inch long arm.

I was looking to put three gourds on a 36 inch arm. Each gourd being about 10-11 inches wide. Is that spacing too close?
Dave Duit
Posts: 1757
Joined: Tue Nov 25, 2003 2:02 pm
Location: Iowa / Nevada
Martin Colony History: In 2020, 60 pair with 285 fledged youngsters. 83 total cavities available, 58 Troyer Horizontal gourds and 4 modified deep trio metal house units, 1 fallout shelter, owl cages around all units. Martin educator and speaker. President and founder of the Iowa Purple Martin Organization. Please visit www.iamartin.org and join.

Hi ridinshotgun,
It would be completely fine to space them three to an arm. The closeness wouldn't make any deterant to the martins as they are only inches away from each other in metal style houses; usually with a porch divider between them on the metal houses. So, gourds can be close without any problems. The only thing you would want to consider is that they don't knock into each other when the winds come up. Other than that, your plans of three toan arm sounds ok.
Mite control, heat venting, predator protection and additional feeding during bad weather add up to success.
ridinshotgun
Posts: 3
Joined: Sat Mar 25, 2017 9:53 pm
Location: Virginia

Ok thanks that helps. I will have to play around with the spacing a little bit once I have the angle in hand along with the gourd hangers from Troyer to see if the interfere with each other when they move or not. Might have a 2x4 in the shop that i can use as a stand in just to see how they work in case i have to make the arms longer that 36 inches.

I had all eight gourds filled this year so it is definitely time to expand.
Dave Duit
Posts: 1757
Joined: Tue Nov 25, 2003 2:02 pm
Location: Iowa / Nevada
Martin Colony History: In 2020, 60 pair with 285 fledged youngsters. 83 total cavities available, 58 Troyer Horizontal gourds and 4 modified deep trio metal house units, 1 fallout shelter, owl cages around all units. Martin educator and speaker. President and founder of the Iowa Purple Martin Organization. Please visit www.iamartin.org and join.

You sound much like me in getting enjoyment i n the process of building, planning and organizing projects. I wish you the best as I know that things will turn out great. I have found over the years that the internet is a super source for ideas and how to do tasks. The martins will appreciate all your efforts in the future.
Mite control, heat venting, predator protection and additional feeding during bad weather add up to success.
ridinshotgun
Posts: 3
Joined: Sat Mar 25, 2017 9:53 pm
Location: Virginia

Yes I enjoy tinkering and building stuff. My entire setup is homemade except for my supergourds. Scrap mostly to put everything together originally but now I figured I would splurge and use the aluminum. Hopefully it lasts as long as I do!
Dave Duit
Posts: 1757
Joined: Tue Nov 25, 2003 2:02 pm
Location: Iowa / Nevada
Martin Colony History: In 2020, 60 pair with 285 fledged youngsters. 83 total cavities available, 58 Troyer Horizontal gourds and 4 modified deep trio metal house units, 1 fallout shelter, owl cages around all units. Martin educator and speaker. President and founder of the Iowa Purple Martin Organization. Please visit www.iamartin.org and join.

Aluminum is a great choice for its longevity. My gourd racks are all homemade as I wanted to beef up it's overall strength due to high wind possibilities. If you can weld it is a great money saver. I had my cousin who is a welder by profession create and weld three large 24 gourd racks. If you can psot pics when you get everything done, that would be great.
Mite control, heat venting, predator protection and additional feeding during bad weather add up to success.
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