Cicada's this year in my area

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flyin-lowe
Posts: 3137
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 8:49 am
Location: Indiana/Henry Co.

My little part of the world is due for the 17 year Cicada cycle. 17 years ago I was just getting started with martins and had some SY's here and there but did not have an established colony yet. I know some of them can be pretty large so I assume they won't feed them to real young hatchlings but I assume martins will thrive this year with the cicadas being available. The first year I was old enough to remember them was 1986. I was in elementary school and we took a field trip to the Cincinnati zoo. They had them thick and the trees at the zoo were completely covered with them when we were there. You could not see the trunk of some of the trees, they were completely covered. Plus it wasn't uncommon for them to fly right onto you, the girls were terrifeid because they would get caught up in their hair. We don't have them quite that bad where I live but there are areas where they are thick. I remember the next time after that I did a lot of fishing. The cicadas were thick on the trees near the bank and would drop into the water. The fish quickly learned and it made for some great top water fishing. As soon as anything hit the water you would get a strike.
202160 nests with 187 eggs (6-3-20) HOSP count-9
2020 Currently 42 nest, Fledged approx 164 HOSP count-8
2019- 31 Pair over 100 fledged
2018- 15 pair last count 49 fledged
2017 3 SY pair nested, 12 eggs total, fledged 10. 4 additional lone SY's
2016 1 pair fledged 4
2015 Visitors
2014 Visitors
2013 Moved 6 miles away, 1 pair fledged 2.
2012 30 pair fledged 100.
2011 12 pair (11 that nested), 43 fledged.
2010 5 pair, 21 eggs, 16 hatched, 14 fledged.
Conrad Baker
Posts: 401
Joined: Fri Jan 12, 2007 7:43 pm
Location: Paulina, Louisiana

I thought the Cicadas were too large for the Martins to eat. Unless the juvenile Cicadas are more tender and easier to eat. I personally haven't seem too many of them at least in the numbers you experience, but have heard them during their "season". It's a sound that wears on you quickly, and starts to become an aggravation and distraction.
Dave Reynolds
Posts: 1940
Joined: Mon Jan 31, 2011 4:35 pm
Location: Little Hocking, Oh.
Martin Colony History: 2018 Success at my Satellite Site “Oxbow Golf Course”.
2019 Success at my home Site "Little Hocking, Ohio".

.. flyin-lowe .. Ours came in 2016 in our area. So it will be a few more years for us here in Southeastern, Ohio.. (2033).. I always wondered if the Martins would eat them. They seem to be a little big for a Martin chick, but the adults could handle one, if they set on the porch and work at it.... I don't think they could eat one on the fly..

Dave
Home Site “Little Hocking, Ohio”
2010 / 2018 -- Lots of Visitors
2019 — 1 Pair, 5 Eggs, 5 Babies, 5 fledged. :wink:
2020 — 1 Pair, 4 Eggs, 4 Babies, 4 fledged. :wink:
2021 — 6 Pair, 23 Eggs, So far. :wink:

Satellite Site “Oxbow Golf Course”
2018 -- 15 Pair, 58 Eggs, 38 Hatched and 36 Fledged :wink:
2019 — 26 Pair, 128 Eggs, 99 Babies and 97 Fledged. :wink:
2020 — 30 Pair, 156 Eggs, 137 Babies and 137 Fledged. :wink:
2021 — 26 Pair, 100 Eggs, So far.. :wink:
PMCA Member
ToyinPA
Posts: 2166
Joined: Mon Apr 10, 2006 6:07 pm
Location: PA/Avis
Martin Colony History: The 1972 St. Agnes flood wiped out all the Martins in my area. One day, in 1997-98, 5 or 6 Martins landed on the power wires crossing my back yard. I had no house for them. They kept coming back day after day. We got a martin house a few weeks later & they have been coming back every year since. I average 12-15 pair per year.

Some adults do try to feed them to their chicks. I have removed a few that were stuck in chicks throats. The same goes with the Great Black Wasp. They have big pincers & latch on to the chicks beak, tongue & throat. I'd suggest if you have the cicadas in your area do more frequent nest checks.

Toy in PA
PMCA Member
TheSmiths
Posts: 334
Joined: Mon May 12, 2014 1:02 pm
Location: Western KY
Martin Colony History:

Tried to attract PMs since 2004; began more ernest attempt in 2014.

Current housing consists of two modified Trio M12Ks and a round gourd rack.

2018 — 3 pairs

2019 — 6 pairs

2020 — 12 pairs; barred owl late in season


Monitor FILs colony as well as colony at park.

~15 years of providing housing for bluebirds, Carolina wrens, house wrens, Carolina chickadees, tufted titmice, great-crested flycatchers and northern flickers.

PMCA video from 2015. Cicada at the 1:17 mark.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OOcZkGIv3Ic

Edit: Added screenshot for those who may be unable to view video.
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Hanover Bill
Posts: 627
Joined: Thu May 14, 2009 3:10 pm
Location: Pennsylvania/Hanover Township
Martin Colony History: 2009 & 10 - 0
2011 & 12 - Visitors
2013 - 2 pr. fledged 9
2014 - 3 pr. fledged 13
2015 - 7 pr. fledged 27
2016 - 15 pr. fledged 72

Two years ago when we had our outbreak I froze about three coffee cans full of them and used them to supplemental feed the following spring. Worked out great, the Martins loved them, saved me money, and just maybe I cut down on the future outbreaks.

If you are due for an outbreak this summer, and you normally do some supplemental feeding in the spring, I would recommend freezing a bunch of them for use in the spring.

Of course I am talking about feeding them to adult birds, not sure about feeding them to fledges.

Hanover Bill.
2009 & 10 - 0
2011 & 12 - Visitors
2013 - 2 pr. fledged 9
2014 - 3 pr. fledged 13
2015 - 7 pr. fledged 27
2016 - 15 pr. fledged 72
Matt F.
Posts: 3922
Joined: Mon Feb 28, 2005 9:48 am
Location: Houston, TX

[duplicate post]
Matt F.
Posts: 3922
Joined: Mon Feb 28, 2005 9:48 am
Location: Houston, TX

We only have the Dog-day Cicadas here in southeast Texas (2-5 year lifecycle - different from the 17-year variants), but one thing is for certain - based on how eager all animals seem to be to catch and eat them (dogs, cats, birds, etc.) I'm convinced they must taste like candy to animals.
TheSmiths
Posts: 334
Joined: Mon May 12, 2014 1:02 pm
Location: Western KY
Martin Colony History:

Tried to attract PMs since 2004; began more ernest attempt in 2014.

Current housing consists of two modified Trio M12Ks and a round gourd rack.

2018 — 3 pairs

2019 — 6 pairs

2020 — 12 pairs; barred owl late in season


Monitor FILs colony as well as colony at park.

~15 years of providing housing for bluebirds, Carolina wrens, house wrens, Carolina chickadees, tufted titmice, great-crested flycatchers and northern flickers.

Hanover Bill, good idea. Definitely more cost effective than crickets.
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