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Unk Bond
Posts: 287
Joined: Fri Feb 12, 2021 4:35 pm
Location: Ohio
Martin Colony History: I have had 5




I have had 5 years of enjoying my martin bird colony.




=

Hello
I saw a link how Martin birds migrate.
I can under stand why my martin birds migrate from my area here in Ohio . Because of are harsh weather coming on..
What I don't know or understand .Why they leave and come to my southern Ohio area. ? Do you know. [ Later
Unk Bond
Posts: 287
Joined: Fri Feb 12, 2021 4:35 pm
Location: Ohio
Martin Colony History: I have had 5




I have had 5 years of enjoying my martin bird colony.




=

Unk Bond wrote:
Mon May 03, 2021 1:06 pm
Hello
I saw a link how Martin birds migrate.
I can under stand why my martin birds migrate from my area here in Ohio . Because of are harsh weather coming on..
What I don't know or understand .Why they leave and come to my southern Ohio area. ? Do you know. [ Later
========================

Hello
Still interested [ Later
SSMartin
Posts: 314
Joined: Sun Jul 21, 2019 6:05 pm
Location: FL

Well they obviously come because all the best Martin houses are built in Amish country.
Rafke77
Posts: 54
Joined: Sun Jan 12, 2020 10:47 pm
Location: Plymouth, IN
Martin Colony History: 2021 Texas deep freeze, first arrived 4/6.

2020 first arrived 3/27. 21 pair, 92 fledged, 9 non viable.

2019 first time with Martin's, first arrived 4/24 10 pair, 24 fledged, 15 eggs non-viable.

Unk Bond wrote:
Mon May 03, 2021 1:06 pm
Hello
I saw a link how Martin birds migrate.
I can under stand why my martin birds migrate from my area here in Ohio . Because of are harsh weather coming on..
What I don't know or understand .Why they leave and come to my southern Ohio area. ? Do you know. [ Later
Are you asking why they come to your area from other areas? Are you thinking they migrate from northern ohio to your area in southern ohio when it gets colder?
Whippy
Posts: 856
Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2017 11:15 pm
Location: Plano, Texas
Martin Colony History: See Signature

I'll take a stab at it.

It's all about the insects. When they leave your home in Ohio, they obviously go down to Brazil and the Amazon to eat all the insects they can find. You can imagine the wealth of insects in that region with all the trees and rivers and such. It's an insect factory.

In the Spring, they obviously Migrate back North to your Home to breed and raise their young. They time this migration with the hatching of insects in your area. The local farming efforts support a myriad of insects as do the lakes, rivers and streams that the Martins prefer to feed their young and themselves.

So they basically go where they can get food. However, as you have read on this site many, many times, once Matins return to their nesting colony it is rare that they leave. Even if it gets really cold and they can't eat, they will stay and die if they don't get taken care of. Our Northern landlords do a fantastic job of supplementing their birds under these conditions. I will say that I don't have evidence supporting that all Martins stay at their colony rather than move to warmer climates under these circumstances. Perhaps another from the North will be able to fill this in a bit with more accurate details.

Coolwhips
2016 - late to put up, many visitors
2017 - 1 pair, 3 fledged
2018- 2 pair, 12 fledged
2019 - 4 pair, 21 fledged
2020 - 15 pair, 67 fledged
Unk Bond
Posts: 287
Joined: Fri Feb 12, 2021 4:35 pm
Location: Ohio
Martin Colony History: I have had 5




I have had 5 years of enjoying my martin bird colony.




=

Whippy wrote:
Tue May 04, 2021 4:20 pm
I'll take a stab at it.

It's all about the insects. When they leave your home in Ohio, they obviously go down to Brazil and the Amazon to eat all the insects they can find. You can imagine the wealth of insects in that region with all the trees and rivers and such. It's an insect factory.

In the Spring, they obviously Migrate back North to your Home to breed and raise their young. They time this migration with the hatching of insects in your area. The local farming efforts support a myriad of insects as do the lakes, rivers and streams that the Martins prefer to feed their young and themselves.

So they basically go where they can get food. However, as you have read on this site many, many times, once Matins return to their nesting colony it is rare that they leave. Even if it gets really cold and they can't eat, they will stay and die if they don't get taken care of. Our Northern landlords do a fantastic job of supplementing their birds under these conditions. I will say that I don't have evidence supporting that all Martins stay at their colony rather than move to warmer climates under these circumstances. Perhaps another from the North will be able to fill this in a bit with more accurate details.

Coolwhips
============================

Hello Whippy
Quote = I'll take a stab at it.
Whippy very nice and appreciated. For your description and explanation.

Taking a stab here at this assumption of mind. That they leave Brazil and the Amazon because they don't furnish breeding houses in Brazil and the Amazon for nesting.So they come to US to find free housing to nest in. Again thanks

Today I built me a drill press platform jig. To hold my nest tray boards To cut a tapered nest hole Using a wheel cutter in my stand drill press to cut the tapered hole. [, Later
Whippy
Posts: 856
Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2017 11:15 pm
Location: Plano, Texas
Martin Colony History: See Signature

Unk Bond wrote:
Tue May 04, 2021 7:06 pm

Hello Whippy
Quote = I'll take a stab at it.
Whippy very nice and appreciated. For your description and explanation.

Taking a stab here at this assumption of mind. That they leave Brazil and the Amazon because they don't furnish breeding houses in Brazil and the Amazon for nesting.So they come to US to find free housing to nest in. Again thanks
The Purple Martin is an American Swallow species that winters in Brazil. American Indians used to hang gourds for them in their villages since they ate so many insects. Since they feed on insects, they can not find any food during the winter months in America so they head South.

I had a baby Martin fall from its gourd last year and, when I put him back, the parents sat on the perch as I was putting him in and I heard the Male Martin tell the Female Martin, "See? I told ya. These Americans are bad a$$!" 8)

Coolwhips
2016 - late to put up, many visitors
2017 - 1 pair, 3 fledged
2018- 2 pair, 12 fledged
2019 - 4 pair, 21 fledged
2020 - 15 pair, 67 fledged
ToyinPA
Posts: 2166
Joined: Mon Apr 10, 2006 6:07 pm
Location: PA/Avis
Martin Colony History: The 1972 St. Agnes flood wiped out all the Martins in my area. One day, in 1997-98, 5 or 6 Martins landed on the power wires crossing my back yard. I had no house for them. They kept coming back day after day. We got a martin house a few weeks later & they have been coming back every year since. I average 12-15 pair per year.

[/quote]

Taking a stab here at this assumption of mind. That they leave Brazil and the Amazon because they don't furnish breeding houses in Brazil and the Amazon for nesting.So they come to US to find free housing to nest in. Again thanks

[/quote]

No. Migration has nothing to do with bird houses. All migrating birds (many different species & millions of them), all over the world, go south for the winter for food. A cold climate does not offer insects or the ability to find grains, greens, fish, etc. Migrating birds return to their summer regions to nest, as food & climate is required to raise their chicks. Once migrating birds find a nesting location they like they stay until food sources or habit is depleted.

Martins rely on humans for houses now, as old world forests were chopped down generations ago & no longer exist.

Toy in PA
PMCA Member
flyin-lowe
Posts: 3137
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 8:49 am
Location: Indiana/Henry Co.

Never thought much about the "American" bird aspect. Are they American birds that over winter in the south or are they South American birds that migrate north to bread?...
You never know what the future will bring. I can remember as a child in the 70's and 80's you would see huge flocks of "Canadian" geese during their migration (I grew up in Indiana). Now they stick around all year it seems. I have also noticed the last 5-10 years that robins are over wintering in Indiana. I never used to see them in the winter, but now we have them year round here. it wouldn't surprise me one bit if one day if some martins started breeding in South America.
202160 nests with 187 eggs (6-3-20) HOSP count-9
2020 Currently 42 nest, Fledged approx 164 HOSP count-8
2019- 31 Pair over 100 fledged
2018- 15 pair last count 49 fledged
2017 3 SY pair nested, 12 eggs total, fledged 10. 4 additional lone SY's
2016 1 pair fledged 4
2015 Visitors
2014 Visitors
2013 Moved 6 miles away, 1 pair fledged 2.
2012 30 pair fledged 100.
2011 12 pair (11 that nested), 43 fledged.
2010 5 pair, 21 eggs, 16 hatched, 14 fledged.
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